H1N1 Information For the Public

Health Alert – Influenza A H1N1 and Seasonal Influenza (“flu”) Vaccine

Schools have reopened in Long Beach and we are anticipating increasing influenza activity in the community with the potential for rapid spread and high demandon health care systems.

The Seasonal Flu Vaccine and the H1H1 Flu Vaccine

The seasonal flu vaccine and the H1N1 flu vaccine are separate vaccinations. A seasonal vaccine is distributed routinely every year, the H1N1flu vaccine is in development for the fall of 2009.

  • The seasonal vaccine does not protect against the H1N1 flu, and the H1N1 flu vaccine is not intended to replace the seasonal flu vaccine. Each protects against a different virus and is intended to be used along-side the other.

  • If available at the same vaccination center, it is likely that seasonal flu and H1N1 flu vaccines may be administered on the same day. The seasonal vaccine, however, will be available earlier than the H1N1 flu vaccine.

  • Early results from clinical trials do show good immune response after 1 dose of the H1N1 flu vaccine in otherwise healthy young adults.  It is not yet known, however, whether 1 or 2 doses will provide sufficient protection for all who are recommended to receive the H1N1 vaccine.

  • The usual seasonal flu is still expected to cause illness this fall and winter. Individuals are encouraged to get their seasonal flu vaccine as soon as it is available in early fall.

Seasonal (Annual) influenza vaccine

H1N1 influenza vaccine

Becoming available throughout the community, as of mid-September, 2009.

Anticipated to be released for administration in the next several weeks (eginning likely in October, 2009). 

Information regarding seasonal flu can be obtained from your healthcare provider, many retail pharmacies, or Click Here

Details regarding where and when to obtain vaccine will be provided as they become available.

Groups Recommended for Vaccine:

Pregnant women

Household contacts and caregivers for children younger than 6 months of age

Healthcare and emergency medical services personnel

Children from 6 months through 18 years of age

Persons aged 19 - 49 years who have health conditions associated with higher risk of medical complications from influenza.*

Adults ages 50 years and older

Initial Target Groups Recommended for Vaccine:

Pregnant women

Household contacts and caregivers for children younger than 6 months of age

Healthcare and emergency medical services personnel

Children from 6 months through 18 years of age

Young adults 19 through 24 years of age

 Persons aged 25 through 64 years who have health conditions associated with higher risk of medical complications from influenza.*

* high risk medical conditions include heart or lung disease, metabolic diseases such as diabetes, conditions that weaken the immune system (such as HIV, cancer, chronic steroid therapy, advanced liver or kidney disease, etc.), and muscle or nerve disorders; for H1N1 flu, obesity seems to also be a risk factor









































INFLUENZA WARNING SIGNS TO SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION:


In children, warning signs include:
  • Fast or troubled breathing
  • Skin turning bluish or gray
  • Persistent or severe vomiting
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Being unusually hard to wake up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child doesn't want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
In adults, serious warning signs include:
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Flu-like symptoms which imporve, but then return with fever and worse cough

    When to seek medical help for possible influenza, including H1N1