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Additional Information
  • Rabbits
  • Housing
  • Warning . . . They Do Like to Chew
  • Rabbit Care Information
  • Dietary Needs
  • Illnesses and Symptoms
  • Handle With Care

    Rabbits are fragile animals who must be handled carefully. Their bones are so delicate that the muscles in their powerful hind legs can easily overcome the strength of their skeletons. As a result, if not properly restrained, struggling rabbits can break their own spines.

    To pick up your rabbit, place one hand underneath the front of the rabbit and the other hand underneath his back side, lifting him carefully with both hands and bringing him against your body. Never let a rabbit's body hang free, never lift by the stomach, and never pick a rabbit up by his ears.

    Don't forget that rabbits are prey animals and many will not enjoy being picked up. Be sure to go slowly with your rabbit and practice. Let your rabbit get accustomed to being handled.

    Rabbits groom each other around the eyes, ears, top of the nose, top of the head, and down the back, so they'll enjoy it if you pet them on their heads. Like any animal, each rabbit will have an individual preference about where he likes to be touched. Rabbits lack the ability to vomit or cough up hairballs like cats, so try to remove loose fur when you have the opportunity to do so. Simply petting or brushing your rabbit for a few minutes each day should remove most of the excess fur. Some rabbit breeds, such as angoras, have extra grooming needs because of their distinctive coats.

    I Need a Friend

    Rabbits are social animals and most will be much happier as a part of a pair or trio than on their own. If you don't have a rabbit yet, consider adopting a bonded pair instead of a single rabbit. Most animal shelters and rabbit rescue groups have pairs available for adoption. If you already have a rabbit, you should consider adding another one to the family. Local rabbit groups can usually find a good match for your rabbit and help with the introduction and bonding process.

    When thinking about adding a rabbit to your family, please remember that rabbits are not toys and they are typically not appropriate pets for children. Rabbits are complex creatures—socially, psychologically, and physiologically. They require a great deal of special care and supervision. If you make the decision to add rabbits to your family, please don't buy from a pet store; instead, adopt from your local animal shelter or rabbit adoption group.

    Strange, but true

    • He’s doing what?! Do not be alarmed if you see your rabbit eating his feces. This may seem strange, but it is perfectly normal and perfectly healthy. The small, soft pellets are an extra source of nutrients and aid in digestion.
    • When they sense danger or don’t feel secure, rabbits thump their back legs on the ground. That’s how Thumper got his name?